Trump is the epitome of a patriarchal society

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Many were absolutely devastated on the morning of 9th November with the shock result of Trump being elected as the 45th USA president. Many journalists have compared the aftermath to an earthquake: Sky News’ Adam Boulton described the result as ‘the seismic shock of earthquake precautions’. BBC News’ Faisal Islam described the outcome as ‘surreal bewilderment’. There was a clear contrast between unity and division and the USA voted for disunion and as a journalist expressed, the ‘tectonic plate of America has shifted’.

The fact that enough Americans have been misguided enough to agree to this extreme right wing style of politics to have the audacity to vote for a racist, ignorant reality TV star, is absolutely terrifying. Trump has made history by being the first ever republican candidate who has never served in the military and he is the only reality TV star to be (as Trump supporters believe) the leader of a free world! Free from what? Racism? Sexism? The oppression of ethnic minorities? As pessimistic as this sounds all he is likely to do is continuously insult and upset enough people that there will be much violence and hatred around the world.

Trump is an inexperienced global politician. Although there is no actual insight into Trump’s politics, he did talk about unifying ‘our great country’.  Nevertheless, many have suggested that Trump is contradicting his own thoughts which were seen within his Presidential acceptance speech – how likely is it that a new Trump has emerged now the presidency is confirmed?

Obama never had control of all the congresses. Trump however does, and the last time the Republican had all three houses it was during the period of The Great Depression. Setting unachievable objectives such as sending Syrians back to ‘to their own country’ and prohibiting Muslims from entering the United States are astonishing. What about the Muslims within the army?

Moreover, there are absolutely no political experiences in Trump’s ‘portfolio’, which allows one to question whether or not he is the applicable president for the United States. One of his main thesis’ was to build an ‘impenetrable, physical, tall, powerful, beautiful, southern border wall’ between the US and Mexico. Which he insisted that Mexico would pay for, beginning on the first day of his administration (according to his official campaign website.) Former Prime Minister David Cameron, suggested that Trump’s remarks were ‘Divisive, stupid and wrong’ – which many young British people agree to, to a large extent.

One ‘Apprentice Fan’ believed she ‘grew up with him’ and claimed she ‘knew him’ depicting the harsh reality of politically disenfranchised America which is hardly portrayed within the media; many have almost been blinded by this celebrity role that he has endorsed. The suggestion that a significant number of Americans did not take this election seriously is heightened by the fact that over 11,000 Americans cast their vote for Harambe! Depicting how angry with the political and establishment machine America actually is. To the rest of the world, America is portrayed as an idealistic country: Being represented with Hollywood, California etc but this election has clearly exemplified how what we see is not realism and that the country is in fact predominantly populated with a number of people who wanted to stick it to the man. Similarly to the Brexit vote, many didn’t realise the effect their vote would have.

Considering the statistics of the voters, some were to an extent foreseen whereas others were unpredictable.  For example, 4/5 uneducated white men whose education was limited only up to college level had cast their votes for Mr Trump. The traditional white male America was always going to have issues voting for a female president, however, the arbitrary result was 45% of women also voted for Trump! Nevertheless, whilst researching, I noticed their education was limited up to college level – which is potentially telling of the mood amongst those left behind.

The most astonishing result was, 65% of white women with no college degree also voted for Trump. One could argue their education is limited and therefore they have very limited knowledge of current affairs, however what about all the sexist and spiteful comments Trump has made towards women, why were they not considered? If any MP had stated anything as harshly as Trump, especially with regards to females, they would have been forced to step down. Why was that not the case for Trump?

Within his usually measured acceptance speech, Trump did in fact talk about ‘unity’ and benefits ‘for all’ which does allow one to question whether or not his proposals were truthful, or if they were just lies in order to gain his votes. This is highlighted by his quote in the 1998 ‘People’s magazine whereby he stated the Republicans are the ‘dumbest group of voters;’ he could tell a lie and they would ‘still eat it up.’

Were Trump’s initial proposals really valid? Or, did he just do this in order to persuade people to vote for him? This is further highlighted by his winning speech, whereby he congratulated Clinton and paid tribute to her for a ‘hard fought campaign.’ In addition, he stated that he was calling ‘for unity’ which again makes one think whether or not his initial proposals were proposed just to gain attention. Additionally, developing infrastructure and creating a number of more jobs whereby he will heavily invest in the economy, thereby increasing deficit within the country was also mentioned. He suggested he was going to build schools, hospitals etc and would therefore be ‘putting millions of people to work.’

I was asked in the morning of the outcome what I thought the main concern was, to which I responded ‘the increase in conflict’ – which I believe would start in America and gradually spread around the world leaving an imprint of ‘The Trump Effect’

Secretary Clinton epitomises the idea of meritocracy. She has worked extremely hard her whole life and this election campaign demonstrated she does not give up on what she truly believes in.

Considering my main audience are young, I wanted to share with you a quote from Clinton herself, which she included in her final email sent to her supporters as well as her concession speech: ‘To all the young people in particular, I want you to hear this. I’ve spent my entire adult life fighting for what I believe in. I’ve had successes and I’ve had setbacks -– sometimes really painful ones. Many of you are at the beginning of your careers. You will have successes and setbacks, too. ‘

She then further on went to state ‘never stop believing that fighting for what’s right is worth it. It’s always worth it. And we need you keep up these fights now and for the rest of your lives.’

Clinton has proven to be a hardworking emblematic candidate fighting for equality and equal rights – an inspiration to particularly many young women – many are heartbroken for her especially because of all the effort put into the campaign. Nevertheless, she herself stated ‘nothing has made her prouder’ than to be their champion. 

Everything that Obama implemented may be reversed, how ironic is it that we went from a black president to a racist one?. But the American people wanted change, and feel they voted for it – we will watch with baited breath to see what comes of it.